Sailing Hatseflats
A 15ft Pram for Dinghy Cruising
20180624
20180625
20180626
20180627
20180628
20180629
20180915
20181014
20190422
20190510
20190511
20190512
20190525
20190601
20190803
20190804
20190805
20190807
20190819
20190820
20190821
20190822
20190823
20190828
20200216
20200603
20200612
20200712
20200718
20200719
20200727
20200822
20200905
20200910
20200911
20200912
20200913
20200920
20210305
20210509
20210724
20210905
20210912
20211003

Hatseflats Design

Hatseflats Hull Build

Fitting Out Hatseflats

Building TooPhat

<< >>

20190807

Published in Dinghy Cruising Journal

On Tuesday we decided to take it easy and rent push bikes. We cycled to Arnis, Kappeln and then rode to the Baltic sea. Near Hasselberg there was a seaside camp site with a trailer slip as a potential starting point for future trips with Hatseflats. We marvelled at the caravans and tents crowding into each other. Later that evening we went to see the seaside resort of Damp south of the Schlei fjord. Again, very crowded with many highrise buildings dating back to the seventies.

On Wednesday it rained, so we went by car to the Viking museum in Haddeby. One thousand years ago, Haithabu (original name for Haddeby) was the center of the world. Traders from the corners of the earth (which then included Russia, the Mediterranean, India and China) sailed their ships up the Eider and Schlei to do business here.

On Thursday morning we had to leave for the Noorderraid. The tent was soaking wet as we packed it in. Before we could leave I had to bail out Hatseflats. We shelved our plans for sailing on the Lille Baelt and the North Frisian coast for another year. Our return trip to Hamburg was a wet ride but at least the traffic was 'fluid' as the French say. Once past Bremen the traffic problems were over. We made our way past Leer and Emden and joined the Noorderraid in Zoutkamp north of the city of Groningen. But that is a different story.



20190807_IMG_1428.JPG Viking ship at Haddeby.